Case Study Houses 28273

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International House has helped thousands of Charlotte's foreign-born residents successfully integrate into our community over the years by providing low-cost English classes, personalized tutoring to help people prepare to become U.S. citizens, affordable legal assistance to help people obtain U.S. citizenship or permanent resident status, and critical summer learning opportunities for young English-language learners. At the same time, we help promote the development of a more tolerant community that recognizes the value and contributions of immigrants to Charlotte's economy, culture and lifestyle, and that offers these newcomers the space and support network needed to be successful in their new home. Our international visitors program introduces leaders from other countries to Charlotte and the businesses and people who make up our city. With opportunities such as our home-hosting program for international visitors and foreign language conversation hours, residents can meet and learn about people from other cultures and countries.

Get involved and explore the world without having to leave Charlotte!

Los Angeles is full of fantastic residential architecture in styles running all over from Spanish Colonial Revival to Streamline Moderne. But the modernist Case Study Houses, sponsored by Arts & Architecture and designed between the mid-1940s and mid-1960s, are both native to SoCal and particularly emblematic of the region (thanks in huge part to photographer Julius Shulman). The houses were intended to be relatively affordable, replicable houses for post-World War II family living, with an emphasis on "new materials and new techniques in house construction," as the magazine's program intro put it. Architects involved included the still-widely-remembered (Charles Eames, Richard Neutra) and the known-only-to-archinerds (JR Davidson, Thornton Abell).

A&A ended up commissioning 36 houses and apartment buildings; a couple dozen were built, and about 20 still stand in the greater Los Angeles area (there's also one in Northern California, a set near San Diego, and one in Phoenix), although some have been remodeled. Eleven were added to the National Register in 2013. Here's a guide to all the houses left to see (but keep in mind that, true to LA form, most are still private residences; the Eames and Stahl Houses—the two most famous Case Study Houses—are occasionally open to visitors).

As for the wonky house numbering, post-1962 A&A publisher David Travers writes that the explanation is "inexplicable, locked in the past."

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