The Essays By Francis Bacon Analysis Meaning

In the opening paragraph, Bacon establishes the importance of friendship by implication when he says "whatsoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god."  He expands on this theme in the same paragraph by saying that, without friends, the "world is but a wilderness."

Bacon's essay is centered on what he calls the "fruit of friendship," of which there are three, and the first is the ability to get rid of...

In the opening paragraph, Bacon establishes the importance of friendship by implication when he says "whatsoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god."  He expands on this theme in the same paragraph by saying that, without friends, the "world is but a wilderness."

Bacon's essay is centered on what he calls the "fruit of friendship," of which there are three, and the first is the ability to get rid of all one's frustrations by having a true friend to listen.  Bacon lived in an era when men believed that our bodies were controlled by "humours"--earth, air, fire and water--and if the humours became unbalanced in our bodies, we got sick.  Bacon likens the balance of humours in the body to balance in the mind, and one restores balance to the mind by unburdening onself to a friend.

The next section of the essay is a long discussion of friendships and failed friendships in classical Roman history, and then Bacon articulates the "second fruit of friendship," which is the result of discussing one's problems with a sympathetic friends, and in the process of "communicating and discoursing with another," one actually becomes "wiser than himself."  But, the second fruit has another half that is just as important, and that is counsel from the friend, which, according to Bacon, is "drier and purer" than the counsel that comes from within oneself.

Bacon compares the third fruit of friendship to a pomegranate, which hundreds of kernels.  Bacon argues that there are many things a man cannot do for himself--praise himself (modestly), ask for help--that a friend can do for him with no embarrassment.  These are among the many kernels of friendship embodied in the third fruit.

Of Truth by Francis Bacon and a Short Analysis What Is Truth? Said Jesting Pilate, and Would Not Stay for an Answer. Certainly There Be, That Delight in Giddiness, and Count It a Bondage to Fix a Belief; Affecting1 Free-

1965 WordsFeb 5th, 20138 Pages

Of Truth by Francis Bacon and A Short Analysis

What is truth? said jesting Pilate, and would not stay for an answer. Certainly there be, that delight in giddiness, and count it a bondage to fix a belief; affecting1 free-will in thinking, as well as in acting. And though the sects of philosophers of that kind2 be gone, yet there remain certain discoursing3 wits, which are of the same veins, though there be not so much blood in them, as was in those of the ancients. But it is not only the difficulty and labor, which men take in finding out of truth, nor again, that when it is found, it imposeth upon4 men's thoughts, that doth bring lies in favor; but a natural though corrupt love, of the lie itself. One of the later school5 of the…show more content…

Saith he, If it be well weighed, to say that a man lieth, is as much to say, as that he is brave towards God, and a coward towards men. For a lie faces God, and shrinks from man. Surely the wickedness of falsehood, and breach of faith, cannot possibly be so highly expressed, as in that it shall be the last peal, to call the judgments of God upon the generations of men; it being foretold, that when Christ cometh, he shall not find faith upon the earth.

Note 1. Loving. Note 2. The Skeptics Note 3. Latin, windy and rambling Note 4. Restricts Note 5. Lucian. Note 6. Lucretius Note 7. Epicureans.

Analysis

As a pragmatic and as an empirical thinker Bacon subscribed to the fundamental Renaissance ideals—Sepantia (search for knowledge) and Eloquentia (the art of rhetoric). Here in the essay Of Truth he supplements his search for truth by going back to the theories of the classical thinkers and also by taking out analogies from everyday life. It is to be noted here that his explication of the theme is impassioned and he succeeds in providing almost neutral judgements on the matter. Again, it is seen that Bacon’s last essays, though written in the same aphoristic manner, stylistically are different in that he supplied more analogies and examples to support or explain his arguments. As this essay belongs to the latter group, we find ample analogies and examples. Bacon, while explaining the reasons as to why

Show More

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *