Aquila Spanish Meaning Of Essay

For other uses, see Selah (disambiguation).

Selah ( or with pronounced audible H; Hebrew: סֶלָה‬, also transliterated as selāh) is a word used seventy-four times in the Hebrew Bible—seventy-one times in the Psalms and three times in Habakkuk.[1] The meaning of the word is not known, though various interpretations are given below. (It should not be confused with the Hebrew word sela` (Hebrew: סֶלַע‬) which means "rock", or in an adjectival form, "like a rock", i.e.: firm, hard, heavy) It is probably either a liturgico-musical mark or an instruction on the reading of the text, something like "stop and listen." Selah can also be used to indicate that there is to be a musical interlude at that point in the Psalm.[2] The Amplified Bible translates selah as "pause, and think of that." It can also be interpreted as a form of underlining in preparation for the next paragraph.

At least some of the Psalms were sung accompanied by musical instruments and there are references to this in many chapters. Thirty-one of the thirty-nine psalms with the caption "To the choir-master" include the word selah. Selah may indicate a break in the song whose purpose is similar to that of Amen (Hebrew: "so be it") in that it stresses the truth and importance of the preceding passage; this interpretation is consistent with the meaning of the Semitic root ṣ-l-ḥ also reflected in Arabic cognate salih (variously "valid" [in the logical sense of "truth-preserving"], "honest," and "righteous"). Alternatively, selah may mean "forever," as it does in some places in the liturgy (notably the second to last blessing of the Amidah). Another interpretation claims that selah comes from the primary Hebrew root word salah (סָלָה‬) which means "to hang," and by implication to measure (weigh).[3]

Etymology[edit]

Its etymology and precise meaning are unknown. This word occurs seventy-one times in thirty-nine of the Psalms and three times in Habakkuk 3: altogether 74 times in the Bible. It is found at the end of Psalms 3, 24, and 46, and in most other cases at the end of a verse, the exceptions being Psalms 55:19, 57:3, and Hab. 3:3, 9, 13.

The significance of this term was apparently not known even by ancient Biblical commentators. This can be seen by the variety of renderings given to it. The Septuagint, Symmachus, and Theodotion translate διάψαλμα (diapsalma, or "apart from psalm") — a word as enigmatic in Greek as is selah in Hebrew. The Hexapla simply transliterates σελ. Aquila, Jerome, and the Targum translate it as "always." According to Hippolytus (De Lagarde, "Novæ Psalterii Græci Editionis Specimen" 10), the Greek term διάψαλμα signified a change in rhythm or melody at the places marked by the term, or a change in thought and theme. Against this explanation Baethgen ("Psalmen," p. 15, 1st ed. Göttingen, 1892) notes that selah also occurs at the end of some psalms.

Modern ideas[edit]

One proposed meaning is given by assigning it to the root, as an imperative that should not properly have been vocalized, "Sollah" (Ewald, "Kritische Grammatik der Hebräischen Sprache,"p. 554; König, "Historisch-Kritisches Lehrgebäude der Hebräischen Sprache," ii., part i., p. 539). The meaning of this imperative is given as "Lift up," equivalent to "loud" or "fortissimo," a direction to the accompanying musicians to break in at the place marked with crash of cymbals and blare of Tets[disambiguation needed], the orchestra playing an interlude while the singers' voices were hushed. The effect, as far as the singer was concerned, was to mark a pause. This significance, too, has been read into the expression or sign, selah being held to be a variant of "shelah" (="pause").[citation needed] But as the interchange of shin ש and samek ס is not usual in Biblical Hebrew, and as the meaning "pause" is not held to be applicable in the middle of a verse, or where a pause would interrupt the sequence of thought, this proposition has met with little favor.[citation needed]

Grätz argues that selah introduces a new paragraph, and also in some instances a quotation (e.g., Psalms 57:8 et seq. from 108:2 et seq.) The fact that the term occurs four times at the end of a Psalm would not weigh against this theory. The Psalms were meant to be read in sequence, and, moreover, many of them are fragments; indeed, Psalm 9 is reckoned one with Psalm 10 in the Septuagint, which omits διάψαλμα (diapsalma) also at the end of Psalms 3, 24, 46 and 68 B. Jacob (l.c.) concludes (1) that since no etymological explanation is possible, selah signifies a pause in or for the Temple song; and (2) that its meaning was concealed lest the Temple privileges should be obtained by the synagogues or perhaps even by the churches.

The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon shows that the main derivation of the Hebrew word selah is found through the fientive verb root סֶ֜לָה which means "to lift up (voices)" or "to exalt," and also carries a close connotational relationship to the verb סָלַל, which is similar in meaning: "to lift up" or "to cast up." The word סֶלָה, which shifts the accent back to the last syllable of the verb form, indicates that in this context, the verb is being used in the imperative mood as somewhat of a directive to the reader. As such, perhaps the most instructive way to view the use of this word, particularly in the context of the Psalms, would be as the writer's instruction to the reader to pause and exalt the Lord.[4]

Contemporary usage[edit]

Gonzo journalistHunter S. Thompson commonly used the word to end articles and personal letters.

Journalist, author and screenwriter George MacDonald Fraser used selah occasionally in The Flashman Papers, a celebrated historical fiction series published between 1969 and 2005.

Selah is used in IyaricRastafarian vocabulary. It can be heard at the end of spoken-word segments of some reggae songs. Its usage here, again, is to accentuate the magnitude and importance of what has been said, and often is a sort of substitute for Amen. Notable, according to Rastafarian faith, is also the word's similarity with the incarnated god and savior Selassie (Ethiopia's former emperor Haile Selassie).

Furman Bisher, the former sports editor and columnist for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, for decades signed off his columns with "Selah." The same is often done by political columnist and blogger Ed Kilgore at the close of a day's postings.

In Predator 2, just before being killed by the predator, the Jamaican drug lord King Willie says, "His foundation lie in the holy mountain" before pausing and adding "Selah."

U2 frontman Bono during a Jimmy Kimmel Live performance announced "Take you to church, Selah," right before the choir started singing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ylSoAxpcKk

"Selah" is the name of both a sculpture and a 2017 exhibtion by artist Sanford Biggers.[5][6]

Literary instances[edit]

  • "Selah" appears several times in the Wanderer and Shadow's song in "Among the Daughters of the Desert" from Nietzsche's "Thus Spoke Zarathustra."
  • "Selah!" is used at the end of the second part (titled Dimanche) of Conversations dans le Loir-et-Cher by French writer Paul Claudel (1935).
  • Selah is the last word in Anita Diamant's book The Red Tent and in Edward Dahlberg's Because I Was Flesh, and according to Charlotte Chandler also the last wordGroucho Marx chose for the extensive biographical work she did with him.
  • Katherine Kurtz uses it in some of her Deryni novels, including The King's Justice (1985); it is among the acquired Eastern influences on the ritual practices of Deryni at King Kelson's court, largely brought by Richenda, Duchess of Corwyn, after her marriage to Duke Alaric Morgan. It is also the last word in Gilbert Sorrentino's novel Little Casino (2002), probably in homage to Dahlberg.
  • In Hunter S. Thompson's collected works "Songs of the Doomed," "The Proud Highway: Saga of A Desperate Southern Gentleman 1955-1967," and Fear and Loathing in America: the Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist, The Gonzo Letters Volume Two 1968-1976 the word Selah is used frequently in letters and diatribes written from the 1960s to the 1990s. The word is used similarly to the word allora in Italy.
  • It is used by the Czech writer and philosopher John Amos Comenius at the end of his book Ksaft.
  • "Selah" is the name of a song by R&B/Hip-Hop artist Lauryn Hill.
  • Selah was defined to mean 'pause and consider' in Babylon 5 episode "Deconstruction of Falling Stars."[7]
  • "Selah" is the title of a miniature for trio (flute, clarinet and piano) by Argentinean composer Juan Maria Solare.[citation needed]
  • The variation "seyla" is used in Battletech as a ritual response during Clan ceremonies.[8]
  • In the 1975 John Huston film The Man Who Would Be King, Daniel Dravot (Sean Connery) punctuates his royal proclamations with "selah."
  • In the humorous essay "New Days in Old Bottles," by Robert Benchley, the narrator ends with the paragraph "Life and the Theatre. Who knows? Selah."[9]

Characters named Selah appear in[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

"Sela" on a Tympanon of the Nikolaikirche in Stralsund
  1. ^"\'Selah\': It Appears 74 Times In The Bible But What Does It Mean?". www.christiantoday.com. Retrieved 2018-01-10. 
  2. ^"Selah in the Psalms". 
  3. ^Tony Warren. "What Does Selah Mean". The Mountain Retreat. Retrieved 2008-09-13. 
  4. ^Brown, F., S. Driver, and C. Briggs. The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon. Hendrickson Publishers, Inc.: Peabody, MA, 2006. (p. 699)
  5. ^"SANFORD BIGGERS: SELAH - Exhibitions - Marianne Boesky". www.marianneboeskygallery.com. Retrieved 2018-01-10. 
  6. ^Cunningham, Vinson (2018-01-08). "The Playful, Political Art of Sanford Biggers". The New Yorker. ISSN 0028-792X. Retrieved 2018-01-10. 
  7. ^"Babylon 5 episode". 
  8. ^http://bg.battletech.com/universe/the-clans/clan-glossary/#seyla
  9. ^Benchley, Robert, Chips Off the Old Benchley, Harper & Row, 1949, pp. 158-64.

This is a list of Latin proverbs and sayings.

ABCDEFGHI or JLMNOPQRSTUV – See also – References

A[edit]

  • A diabolo, qui est simia dei.
    • English equivalent: Where god has a church the devil will have his chapel.
    • "Wherever God erects a house of prayer,
      The Devil always builds a chapel there:
      And 'twill be found, upon examination,
      The latter has the largest congregation."
    • Daniel Defoe, The True-Born Englishman (1701)
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 874. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Abbati, medico, patrono que intima pande.
    • English equivalent: Conceal not the truth from thy physician and lawyer.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 666. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Absens haeres non erit.
    • English equivalent: Out of sight, out of mind.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 16. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Abyssus abyssum invocat.
    • English equivalent: Deep calls to deep.
    • "The more of the context of a problem that a scientist can comprehend, the greater are his chances of finding a truly adequate solution."
    • Russell L. Ackoff, The development of operations research as a science (1956)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 695. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Acquirit qui tuetur.
    • English equivalent: Sparing is the first gaining.
    • Burke (2009). The General Armory of England, Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, Comprising a Registry of Armorial Bearings from the Earliest to the Present Time. Heritage Books. p. 710. ISBN 0788437208. 
  • Acta Non Verba.
    • Translations: Deeds, not words - motto of the United States Merchant Marine Academy, at Kings Point, New York, USA.
    • English equivalents: Words are leaves, deeds are fruits.
    • Fuschetto (2003). Kings Point: Acta Non Verba. Diversified Graphics, Incorporated. 
  • Ancipiti plus ferit ense gula.
    • English equivalent: Gluttony kills more than the sword.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 864. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Aegroto dum anima est, spes est.
    • English equivalent: As long as there is life there is hope.
    • Erasmus, Mynors (1991). Collected Works of Erasmus: Adages II I 1 to II VI 100. University of Toronto Press. p. 467. ISBN 0802059546. 
  • Aeque pars ligni curvi ac recti valet igni.
    • English equivalent: Crooked logs make straight fires.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 683. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Age quod agis.
    • Translation and English equivalent: Do what you do, in the sense of "Do well what you do", "Do well in whatever you do" or "Be serious in what you do"
    • The Nation. Nation Company. 1884. p. 425. 
  • Age si quid agis.
    • Translation: "If there is something [quid for aliquid] you do (well), carry on", "If you do something, do it well" see also "Age quod agis"
    • English equivalent: Bloom where you are planted.
    • Lindsay (1968). Early Latin verse. Oxford U. P.. p. 21. 
  • Aliis si licet, tibi non licet.
    • Translation: If others are allowed to, that does not mean you are. (see also quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi)
    • Patrick (1810). Terence's Comedies. Gilbert and Hodges. p. 345. 
  • An nescis, mi fili, quantilla prudentia mundus regatur? (alternatively: regatur orbis)
  • Aliquis in omnibus est nullus in singulis.
    • Translation: Someone in all, is nothing in one.
    • English equivalent: Jack of all trades, master of none; Jack of all trades begs bread on Sundays.
    • "Somebody who has a very wide range of abilities or skills usually does not excel at any of them."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 156. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 70. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Arcem ex cloacâ facĕre.
    • English equivalent: Don't make a mountain out of a molehill.
    • Proverbs of All Nations. W. Kent & Company (late D. Bogue). 1859. p. 58. 
  • Atqui, e lotio est.
    • Translation: Yet it comes from urine.
    • Emperor Vespasian to his son Titus, when the latter, complaining about the former's urine tax, acknowledged a coin collected had no odor.
  • Auctoritas non veritas facit legem
  • Audi, vide, tace, si tu vis vivere (in pace).
    • Translation: Hear, see, be silent, if you wish to live (in peace). Roman proverb, according to this.
    • English equivalent: Rather see than hear.
  • Aut inveniam viam aut faciam.
    • Alternate phrasing: Aut viam inveniam aut faciam
    • Translation: I'll either find a way or make one.
    • English equivalent: Where there's a will, there's a way.
    • "If you are sufficiently determined to achieve something, then you will find a way of doing so."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 299. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Stone, J. R. (2005). The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati's Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs and Sayings, Routledge. p. 351

B[edit]

  • Basio saepe volam, cui plagam diligo solam.
    • English equivalent: Many kiss the hand they wish cut off.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1084. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bellum se ipsum alet.
    • War will feed on itself.
    • Roberts (2003). The Age of Liberty: Sweden 1719-1772. Cambridge University Press. p. 19. 
  • Bene diagnoscitur, bene curatur.
    • English equivalent: A disease known is half cured.
    • Meyer, Ndura-Ouédraogo (2009). Seeds of new hope: pan-African peace studies for the 21st century. Africa World Press. p. 331. ISBN 1592216625. 
  • Brevis oratio penetrat coelos; Longa potatio evacuat scyphos.

C[edit]

  • Carpe diem.
    • Translation: "Seize the day." By Horace, Odes I,11,8, to Leuconoe: carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero ("take hold of the day, believing as little as possible in the next"). The verb "carpere" has the literal meaning "to pick, pluck," particularly in reference to the picking of fruits and flowers, and was used figuratively by the Roman poets to mean "to enjoy, use, make use of."
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Carthago delenda est.
    • Translation: "Carthage is to be destroyed." Actually, ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam ("Apart from that, I conclude that Carthage must be destroyed") Cato the Elder used to end every speech of his to the Senate, on any subject whatsoever, with this phrase. Mentioned to indicate that someone habitually harps on one subject.
  • Cave ab homine unius libri.
    • English equivalent: Fear the man of one book.
    • "Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so."
    • Douglas Adams, Last Chance to See (1990)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 851. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cedens in uno cedet in pluribus.
    • English equivalent: Virtue which parleys is near a surrender.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 957. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Citius venit malum quam revertitur.
    • English equivalent: Misfortune comes on horseback and goes away on foot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 65. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cito maturum cito putridum.
    • English equivalent: Early ripe, early rotten.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 758. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cogitationes posteriores sunt saniores.
    • English equivalent: Second thoughts are best.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 747. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Consilio, quod respuitur, nullum subest auxilium.
    • English equivalent: He that will not be counseled cannot be helped.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 964. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Consuetudinis magna vis est
    • English equivalent: Old habits die hard.
    • Cicero, Tusculanae Quaestiones, II.37
  • Consuetudo altera natura est
    • English equivalent: Old habits die hard.
    • Breen (2010). Imagining an English Reading Public, 1150-1400. Cambridge University Press. p. 46. ISBN 0521199220. 
  • Contritium praecedit superbia.
    • English equivalent: Pride comes before fall.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1148. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cor boni concilii statue tecum non est enim tibi aliud pluris illo.
    • English equivalent: Though thou hast ever so many counsellors, yet do not forsake the counsel of thy own soul.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1044. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Corruptissima re publica plurimae leges
    • Translation: The greater the degeneration of the republic, the more of its laws.
    • (Tacitus) Annals (117)
  • "Credula est spes improba.
    • English equivalent: He that lives on hope will die fasting.
    • "Do not pin all your hopes on something you may not attain, because you could end up with nothing."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 952. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cui caput dolet, omnia membra languent.
    • English equivalent: When the head is sick, the whole body is sick.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1117. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Cuilibet fatuo placet sua calva.
    • English equivalentː Every fool is pleased with his own folly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "147". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Cuiusvis hominis est errare, nullius nisi insipientis in errore perseverare. —
    • Any man can make a mistake; only a fool keeps making the same one.
    • English equivalent: He wrongfully blames the sea who suffers shipwreck twice.
    • "Papa Hegel he say that all we learn from history is that we learn nothing from history. I know people who can't even learn from what happened this morning. Hegel must have been taking the long view."
    • John Brunner, Stand on Zanzibar (1968)
    • Marcus Tullius Cicero, Philippica XII, ii, 5
  • Curae canitiem inducunt.
    • English equivalent: Fretting cares make grey hairs.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 631. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Custode et cura natura potentior omni.
    • English equivalent: Nature is beyond all teaching.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 764. ISBN 0415096243. 

D[edit]

  • Deus quem punire vult dementat.
    • English equivalent: Whom God will destroy, he first make mad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 841. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Diem vesper commendat.
    • Translation: Celebrate the day when it is evening.
    • Meaning: Don't celebrate untill you are 100 % sure there is a reason to do so.; Don't count your chickens before they're hatched.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 200. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Difficile est longum subito deponere amorem.
    • English equivalent: True love never grows old.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1107. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dii facientes adiuvant.
    • Translation: Gods help those who do.
    • English equivalent: God helps them that help themselves.
    • Meaning: "When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 150. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Cantera Ortiz de Urbina, Jesús (16 November 2005). "975". Refranero latino. Ediciones Akal. p. 83. ISBN 978-84-460-1296-2. 
  • Dives aut iniquus est, aut iniqui heres.
    • English equivalent: No one gets rich quickly if he is honest.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 963. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dives est qui sibi nihil deesse putat.
    • Translation: The rich man is the one who thinks to himself that nothing was lacking.
    • Note: Another way to phrase this is by this quote:
      • No one – not a single person out of a thousand [elderly interviewed because of their wisdom expertise] – said that to be happy you should try and work as hard as you can to make money to buy the things you want.
      • No one – not a single person –– said it's important to be at least as wealthy as the people around you, and if you have more than they do it's real success.
      • No one – not a single person –– said you should choose your work based on your desired future earning power.”
    • From: Brody, Jane (2011). 30 Lessons for Living. Penguin Group. p. 57. ISBN 1594630844. 
    • English equivalent: Wealth rarely brings happiness.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 670. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Divide et impera.
    • Translation: Divide and govern [or conquer]. Attributed to Julius Caesar.
    • English equivalent: Divide and conquer.
    • Meaning: "The best way to conquer or control a group of people is by encouraging them to fight among themselves rather than allowing them to unite in opposition to the ruling authority."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 57. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 13 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "823". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Docendo discimus.
    • Translation: We learn by teaching. (Seneca)
    • Vahros (1986). Docendo discimus. University Press. 
  • Duabus ancoris fultus.
    • English equivalent: Good riding at two anchors, men have told, for if the one fails, the other may hold.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Ductus Exemplo
    • Translation: Lead by Example.
    • Gray (2009). Embedded: a Marine Corps adviser inside the Iraqi army. Naval Institute Press. p. 74. ISBN 1591143403. 
  • Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori.
    • Translation: It is sweet and honorable to die for the fatherland. By Horace, Odes III, 2, 13, frequently quoted on war memorials, and notably in the poem Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen, who calls it "the old lie".
  • Dulce pomum quum abest custos.
    • Translation: Sweet is the apple when the keeper is away.
    • English equivalent: Forbidden fruit is sweetest.
    • Meaning: "Things that you must not have or do are always the most desirable."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 93. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • János Erdélyi (1851). Magyar közmondások könlyve. Nyomatott Kozma Vazulnál. p. 169. 
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations (W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue) ed.). p. 93. 
  • Dulcior illa sapit caro, quae magis ossibus haeret.
    • English equivalent: The sweetest flesh is near the bones.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "1666". Dictionary of European proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1176. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Dum canem caedimus, corrosisse dicitur corrium.
    • Translation: If you want to beat a dog you will easily find a stick.
    • Meaning: Someone who wants to be mean will find things to be mean about no matter what.
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 104. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Dum satur est venter, gaudet caput inde libenter.
    • Translation: When the belly is full, the head is pleased.
    • English equivalent: Full stomach, contented heart.
    • Cantera Ortiz de Urbina, Jesús (16 November 2005). "768". Refranero latino. Ediciones Akal. p. 68. ISBN 978-84-460-1296-2. 
  • Dum spiro, spero.
    • Translation: "As long as I breathe, I hope." Translated as "While I breathe, I hope" the motto of the State of South Carolina [[1]]
    • Gunter (2000). Dum Spiro, Spero: While I Breathe, I Hope. In His Steps Publishing. pp. 180. ISBN 1585350192. 
    • English equivalent: As long as there is life there is hope.
  • Dum vivimus, vivamus!
    • Translation: While we live, let us live!
    • Organization) (1972). Dum Vivimus, Vivamus: A Chronicle of the First Century of the Knights of Momus, 1872-1972. 
  • Dum vita est, spes est.
    • Translation: While there is life, there is hope.
    • Bretzke (1998). Consecrated Phrases: A Latin Theological Dictionary : Latin Expressions Commonly Found in Theological Writings. Liturgical Press. p. 41. ISBN 1. 

E[edit]

  • Ecce omnis, qui dicit vulgo proverbium, in te assumet illud dicens: Sicut mater, ita et filia ejus.
    • Translation: Behold, every one that useth a common proverb, shall use this against thee, saying, As is the mother, so is her daughter.
    • English equivalent: Like mother, like daughter.
    • Meaning: "Daughters may look and behave like their mothers. This is due to inheritance and the example observed closely and daily."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 137. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Effectus sequitir causam.
    • Translation: Effect follows a reason.
    • English equivalent: Every why has a wherefore.
    • Meaning: "Everything has an underlying reason."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 22 September 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 765. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Eodem cubito, eadem trutina, pari libra.
    • Translation: The elbow, the same balance, an equal balance.
    • English equivalent: Whatever measure you deal out to others will be dealt back to you.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1219. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Et ipsa scientia potestas est.
    • Translation: "And knowledge itself, is power" (Francis Bacon, Meditationes sacrae)
    • Djité (2008). The Sociolinguistics of Development in Africa. Multilingual Matters. p. 53. ISBN 1847690459. 
  • Ex malis moribus bonae leges natae sunt.
    • Translation: Bad customs have given birth to good laws.
    • English equivalent: Good laws have sprung from bad customs.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Exceptio probat regulam in casibus non exceptis.
    • Translation: "The exception confirms the rule in cases not excepted" (Cicero, Pro Balbo)
    • Meaning: If an exception to a rule is explicitly stated (such as a "no right turns on red light" sign at an intersection), that allows one to conclude the general rule to which this is an exception (i.e. "right turns are permitted on red lights unless a sign says otherwise").
    • English equivalent: "The exception proves the rule" (though this is often used in other senses).
  • Excusatio non petita, accusatio manifesta.
    • English equivalent: A guilty conscience needs no accuser.
    • Meaning: "People who know they have done wrong reveal their guilt by the things they say or the way they interpret what other people say."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 112. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "243". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 227. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Extremis malis extrema remedia.
    • Translation: Extreme remedies for extreme ills.
    • English equivalent: Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.
    • Meaning: "Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation."
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 10 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 688. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Expecta bos olim herba.
    • Translation: Waiting for the grass the cow dies.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows the steed starves.
    • Meaning: Dreams or expectations may be realized too late.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1228. ISBN 0415096243. 

F[edit]

  • Factis ut credam facis.
    • English equivalent: No need of words, trust deeds.
    • Meaning: Actions may be, and indeed sometimes are deceptive in a measure though not as much so as words; and accordingly are received in general as more full and satisfactory proofs of the real disposition and character of persons than verbal expressions.
    • Source for meaning:Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 10. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 91. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Festina lente!
    • Translation: Make haste slowly.
    • English equivalent: More speed less haste.
    • English meaning: proceed quickly but with caution, a motto of Marcus Aurelius
    • Rochester Institute of Technology (1980). Festina lente. 
  • Fides facit fidem.
    • English equivalent: Confidence begets confidence.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Fidite Nemini
    • Translation: Trust no one.
    • Cinderella, The More Things Change (1991)
    • Conciones Adventuales: De De Captivitate Petri, Figurante Captivitatem Peccatoris. Verdussen. 1737. p. 113. 
  • Finis origine pendet.
    • Translation: The end hangs on the beginning.
    • English equivalent: Such a beginning, such an end.
    • Meaning: The outcome of things depends on how they start.
  • Fortes fortuna iuvat
    • Translation: Fortune favors the brave. (cf. Audaces fortuna iuvat.) (Terence)
    • Marchesi (2008). The Art of Pliny's Letters: A Poetics of Allusion in the Private Correspondence. Cambridge University Press. p. 176. ISBN 0521882273. 
  • Fraus hominum ad perniciem, et integritas ad salutem vocat.

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